xDSL

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a family of technologies that transmits digital data over a local telephone network line. For over a decade, DSL has been the most adopted last-mile technology in the broadband market. As it makes use of telephone lines, DSL is the most convenient and cost effective way to enable Internet connections on legacy infrastructure.

ADSL2+

Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line Version 2 Plus (ADSL2+), a technology of the xDSL family, is widely adopted nowadays among other xDSL technologies. Commonly offered in highly-populated metropolitan areas, ADSL2+ is also a favored solution for sparsely populated areas with fewer multidwelling units, where DSL is more cost-effective than FTTH/B (Fiber to the Home / building) solutions. ADSL2+ data rates can be as high as 24 Mbps downstream and up to 1.4 Mbps upstream depending on the distance from a Central Office (CO) to the business or home premise.

VDSL2

Designed to support the wide deployment of triple play services, Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Line 2 (VDSL2) offers ultra-high data rates of up to 100 Mbps (at 500m from a CO), providing sufficient bandwidth for VoIP, HDTV, and on-line gaming services. To maintain the high data rate, a typical deployment scenario of VDSL2 uses FTTB/C (Fiber-To-The-Building / Curb) as its backbone.

D-Link provides an array of ADSL2+/VDSL modems and routers to fulfill the various demands of Service Providers and end-customers. With the support of Remote Support System (RSS), D-Link DSL routers minimize the time needed to troubleshoot problems on home networks, reducing operating costs and service expenses. Compliant with the Home Gateway Initiative Smart QoS, D-Link DSL routers automatically detect the type of connected devices and assign a pre-defined priority for each device. This QoS support allows users to enjoy high transmission for applications such as IPTV, VoIP, and on-line games over the Internet. The D-Link DSL modems and routers provide all the essentials that a home or small office needs to establish a high-speed remote link to the outside world.